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at the ground up. all the way up. [inaudible] let me talk about stephen's case, which he brought in the federal district court in new jersey. this was a man whose wife was a math teacher in high school. she had a healthy pregnancy. she remained in the classroom until the ninth month she went to the hospital to give birth, and the doctor came out and said, you have a healthy baby boy, but your wife died from an embolism. he was determined that he would not work full-time until the child was in school full-time. he would earn a minimum he could make, and combined with social security benefits, make a living for himself and his infant son. we went to the social security office. they said we are very sorry, but these are mothers benefits. they are not available. they are available to widowed mothers, but not widowed fathers. i came to know about stephen's case when he wrote a letter to the editor, and he said i've been hearing a lot of talk about women's this. this is what happened to me. how does that fit in? tell my story to gloria steinem. so at the time i was teaching at rutgers, the state univ
, stephen finan. this is live coverage on c-span2. >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> once again we are live on c-span2 at the immigrationworks u.s.a. at the woodrow wilson center for a forum hosted by immigrationworks u.s.a., look at the impact of the latino vote on the 2012 presidential race. we do expect it to get started in just a moment here. also starting live on the companion network c-span3, the pew center is hosting a daylong caucus on the voter experience of 2012. featuring representatives from google, facebook, microsoft and twitter. republican and democratic secretaries of state are also part of that discussion. that has just gotten underway life on our companion network c-span3. also coming up today the center for american progress is hosting a conference. this white house national economic council gene sperling and others are taking part on how education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. that's exp
as they a or b report makes clear. as you said, chris stephens understood in gaza as was anyone and understood the risks as well as anyone, but i think one of the painful lessons we've learned is the imports of being able to take a step back and try to analyze better the broader pattern of security challenges that were emerging. so there's a sense of response build on the part of all of us in the state department for trying to better understand those challenges, not be fixated on credible threats and taken into account in keeping with what was the obvious security and adequacies made all these by the accountability review board in benghazi spent on non-going to be interested and i think all the members will be interested as to how you institutionalize that review that go beyond just simple threats. i would hope you would share -- secretary, you mentioned i think he said streamlining a process or you could move quicker to implement. you also mentioned there may be some concerned with additional marine assignments with the host country. is there anything that we need to be aware of as you implem
thing verbatim. to stephen barlett, copy to ds command center, subject benghazi up to you. the command center is sharing a terrorism event information for your situational awareness. these contact the ds command center for any requester information. as of 0500 eastern standard time the mission of benghazi has been evacuated due to ongoing attacks that resulted in the death of four chiefs of mission personnel, including u.s. ambassador to libya to three additional wounded. at this time, everyone has been evacuated to tripoli as receiving medical aid and awaiting further movement. this is an initial terrorist incident report from the ds command center. this information contained in this report is provided only for immediate situational awareness. additional reports may follow. updating and correcting information protect accordingly. spu this e-mail is unclassified number prevented by voodoo christopher r. page 101. my concern is this, we knew from the start that it was a terrorist attack. it was a terrorist event and for whatever reason we chose to call it something else, a youtube video
tax hike if we don't act. for weeks stephen has been trying to get the president to come up with a fair, reasonable and balanced solution so we don't go over the cliff. the president thinking he has some sort of a mandate after his reelection has been less than reasonable. in fact, this president has proposed more and more spending and more and more tax hikes in his proposals to the spreerk while the spreerk is -- speaker to is trying to deal with our $16 trillion debt, now $16.4 trillion. the president just can't take yes for an answer. he must think if he keeps slow walking these proposals, the republicans will get the blame and members of his administration have even revealed that they would be more than happy if we went over the cliff. what kind of cruel christmas gift is that? after the speaker and the president exchanged offers this week, house republicans are looking at having votes on two competing pieces of legislation as early as tomorrow. the first is legislation that passed this body over the summer, deeply flawed legislation that every democrat in this body supp
a question -- >> identify yourself, please. >> my name is stephen hank, and i have no affiliation. i'm just retired, come to cato events all the time. i want to ask a question that you probably might consider outside the box, but everything, everything that you're both, you're all saying sort of assumes that there should be criterion of some type administered by the university whether it's academic achievement. and i'd like to throw out to you why the idea that every other service of that's provided in our society is divvied up by price and, therefore, when the people who most need it, who most need it will determine that they're willing to pay the price for the best education. and, in fact, a lot of times you have really brilliant people who have no need to go to university, and they're going to get very little out of things, and it may be the weakest student that may get the best, the most out of the education. my question to you is why is this ab sent in any discussion, what i've just said, of affirmative action or of education? and it's pretty clear that the customers in this situation
office of state finance where she worked for governor frank. next on the panel we have stephen penner, who is the institute fellow and the rj and francis miller chair and public policy at the urban institute. prior to that in his long and distinguished career as he was the director of the congressional budget office where he supervised a young economist who didn't learn a whole lot and that's why i am here and rudy has had a distinguished career that he has had, but i remember those conversations and i hope i can do them justice today to read his also served as the deputy assistant secretary for economic affairs and a senior staff economist at the council of economic advisers. finally, last but not least, we have david walker, founder and ceo of a comeback america initiative david farley the comptroller general of the united states she was also director of the head of the u.s. government accountability office for also, the to tenures. he is widely read and author numerous articles on the deficit coming and he has a new initiative out there now that i think makes tremendous sense it ma
's financial future is stephen joining us from the associated press where he is a reporter. thank you for being here. how many people in america received social security and how much do they get? >> 56 million people get social security and the average benefit is a little over 12,000, a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe 13, $14,000 a year. >> we are talking about retirees come also the disabled. >> there are actually a fairly wide group of people that social security benefits, retired workers, espouses, children, disabled workers, widows it is actually a fairly big social safety net of people who get the social security benefits. >> you mentioned 56 million beneficiaries those retirees receive $1,200 on average. the benefits for disabled, $1,100 on average. also the benefit supplemental security income about $500 a month. how does it get paid for? how does the social security debt-financed? >> it's been a self funded program since its inception and it is funded by the payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. you make more than that any money you make is it is part of
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8